A solar eclipse is about to cast a shadow over the state

A total solar eclipse is set to cover South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia next week

Get your solar watchers on–the first of two solar eclipses visible in the next seven months is next week, and the Upstate will be enjoying part of it. The annual total solar eclipse path begins in Oregon on Saturday, October 14th in the United States. 9:13 am PDT and ends at 12:03 pm CDT in Texas. According to the Great American Eclipse website, “If you could design an eclipse path that maximizes the number of national parks in its path, this is it.” “There will be a total shadow over Crater Lake National Park, Great Basin National Park and others in the Four Corners area,” the website says. A partial solar eclipse will also be visible in other parts of the United States. Carolinas and Georgia. More news (Continued after links.) Voyeurism, Upstate student charged with criminal conspiracy, SC man trapped under 16,000-pound equipment, principal says Greenville County construction site fire investigation, rescuers say: Here’s what we know Overhead, the eclipse will block 45% of the Sun. The celestial event will begin at 11:47 a.m., with maximum eclipse at 1:14 p.m., and here’s the last total eclipse at 2:44 p.m. Like on August 21, 2017 at Clemson’s Bowman Field. Viewing times across our entire viewing area vary from a few seconds to a minute. Remember to wear solar eclipse glasses or safety glasses if you plan to view the eclipse. Read about what glasses to wear here. The next total solar eclipse will occur in parts of the United States on April 8, 2024. The path of totality will stretch from Texas to Indiana, across the Mississippi River, and out to New York next year. After crossing Maine, the U.S. Upstate is not in the path of totality, but will still see an 85% partial eclipse on April 8. The eclipse begins at 1:50 PM and ends at 3:09 PM with a maximum of 70% eclipsed at 4 PM. :24 pm Well, the Upstate’s next total eclipse sky view won’t happen until March 30, 2052. Here’s what the last total eclipse of 2017 looked like.

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Get your solar watchers on–Next week, the Upstate will experience part of the first of two solar eclipses visible in the next seven months.

The total annual solar eclipse path will begin in the United States on Saturday, October 14 at 9:13 AM PDT in Oregon and end at 12:03 PM CDT in Texas.

“If you could design the eclipse path to increase the number of national parks in its path, this is it,” it says. Great American Eclipse website. “There will be a total shadow over Great Lakes National Park, Great Basin National Park and others in the Four Corners region,” the website says.

A partial solar eclipse will be visible in other parts of the United States, including the Carolinas and Georgia.

More News (Story continues after links.)

Overhead, the eclipse will block 45% of the Sun.

The celestial event will begin at 11:47 a.m., the eclipse will reach maximum at 1:14 p.m., and end at 2:44 p.m.

Here’s what’s at last Total On August 21, 2017, the eclipse was visible from Clemson’s Bowman Field.

Viewing time varies from only a few seconds to a minute across our entire viewing area.

Remember to wear solar eclipse glasses or safety glasses if you plan to view the eclipse. Read about what glasses to wear here.

The next total solar eclipse will occur in parts of the United States on April 8, 2024

Next year’s path of totality will extend from Texas to Indiana, along the Mississippi River, into New York and across Maine to exit the United States.

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Upstate is not in the path of totality, but will see about an 85% partial eclipse on April 8.

The eclipse shadow will begin at 1:50 PM, with a maximum 70% eclipse shadow at 3:09 PM, ending at 4:24 PM.

In fact, the Upstate’s next total eclipse sky show won’t happen until then March 30, 2052.

Here’s what the last total eclipse of 2017 looked like.

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