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Raise a flag, raise awareness

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November is Pulmonary Hypertension Awareness Month across Canada and the Town of Grand Falls-Windsor will be raising a flag in hopes or promoting awareness.

There are also plans to officially proclaim November Pulmonary Hypertension Awareness Month in the town of Grand Falls-Windsor.

“We’re hoping to bring some awareness to the cause,” said Grand Falls-Windsor resident Carson King. “We’ve been dealing with this as a family for some time now.”

Kings daughter-in-law is Grand Falls-Windsor resident and former Woodland Primary teacher, Wendy King. Wendy was first diagnosed with the rare disease in 2010 but was able to continue working at the school up until December 2014.

According to the Pulmonary Hypertension Association website: transplant of the lungs or both lungs and heart is often a last treatment option in certain patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH).

However in March of this year, doctors decided it was necessary to perform the procedure and King headed to Toronto to begin her assessments.

Now with the operation complete, King is in Ontario recovering from the double lung transplant.

The procedure is expected to resolve the issue once and for all.

“The lung transplant alleviates the narrowing of the arties, so the heart is no longer struggling to pump the blood,” said King. “Now the enlargement of the heart, which occurred during the illness, that’s still there, and has to correct itself over time, but the actual condition, PH, should be taken care of with the transplant.”

Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the arteries in the lungs and the right side of the heart.

In one form of pulmonary hypertension, tiny arteries in the lungs, called pulmonary arterioles, and capillaries become narrowed, blocked or destroyed

This is the form of the disease that attacked Wendy in 2010, but her father-in-law remains optimistic.

“We hear stories of people going through this procedure and coming back and doing things like going back to work, riding bicycles, doing normal exercise routines,” said King. “So, yeah, if everything goes well, she should go back to resuming a normal life.

King says the support the family has received from residents in central and the town of Grand Falls-Windsor has been invaluable.

“The people here have rallied around and provided support both financial and emontial to Wendy,” said King. “It’s meant a lot, not only to Wendy, but to the family as well.

Patrick.murphy@tc.tc

There are also plans to officially proclaim November Pulmonary Hypertension Awareness Month in the town of Grand Falls-Windsor.

“We’re hoping to bring some awareness to the cause,” said Grand Falls-Windsor resident Carson King. “We’ve been dealing with this as a family for some time now.”

Kings daughter-in-law is Grand Falls-Windsor resident and former Woodland Primary teacher, Wendy King. Wendy was first diagnosed with the rare disease in 2010 but was able to continue working at the school up until December 2014.

According to the Pulmonary Hypertension Association website: transplant of the lungs or both lungs and heart is often a last treatment option in certain patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH).

However in March of this year, doctors decided it was necessary to perform the procedure and King headed to Toronto to begin her assessments.

Now with the operation complete, King is in Ontario recovering from the double lung transplant.

The procedure is expected to resolve the issue once and for all.

“The lung transplant alleviates the narrowing of the arties, so the heart is no longer struggling to pump the blood,” said King. “Now the enlargement of the heart, which occurred during the illness, that’s still there, and has to correct itself over time, but the actual condition, PH, should be taken care of with the transplant.”

Pulmonary hypertension is a type of high blood pressure that affects the arteries in the lungs and the right side of the heart.

In one form of pulmonary hypertension, tiny arteries in the lungs, called pulmonary arterioles, and capillaries become narrowed, blocked or destroyed

This is the form of the disease that attacked Wendy in 2010, but her father-in-law remains optimistic.

“We hear stories of people going through this procedure and coming back and doing things like going back to work, riding bicycles, doing normal exercise routines,” said King. “So, yeah, if everything goes well, she should go back to resuming a normal life.

King says the support the family has received from residents in central and the town of Grand Falls-Windsor has been invaluable.

“The people here have rallied around and provided support both financial and emontial to Wendy,” said King. “It’s meant a lot, not only to Wendy, but to the family as well.

Patrick.murphy@tc.tc

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