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Marking sacrifice at Masonic Lodge

Grand Falls-Windsor Mayor Barry Manuel, right, presented Right Worshipful Master Brother Paul Evans with a plaque commemorating this occasion of a one-act play commemorating the many members of the local lodge who served at Beaumont Hamel.
Grand Falls-Windsor Mayor Barry Manuel, right, presented Right Worshipful Master Brother Paul Evans with a plaque commemorating this occasion of a one-act play commemorating the many members of the local lodge who served at Beaumont Hamel.

The Masonic Lodge Northcliffe in Grand Falls-Windsor paid tribute to its member’s who served at Beaumont Hamel on Nov. 1.

This being the 100th anniversary of the battle in 2016, mason Gerald Thompson wrote a one-act play as a tribute to their memory.

A number of local dignitaries attended including Grand Falls-Windsor—Buchans MHA and Minister of Transportation and Works Allan Hawkins; Exploits MHA Jerry Dean; Noble Grand – Dennis Cooper; Dave Barker – Knights of Columbus; Joe Kennedy - Royal Canadian Legion and the Right Worshipful District Grand Master Brother W. Scott Bartlett.

At the function, Grand Falls-Windsor Mayor Barry Manuel presented Right Worshipful Master Brother Paul Evans with a plaque commemorating this occasion.

 

They That Served

 

By Gerald Thompson

 

The call from the king went out

The men from the island answered no doubt

They left the boats of the sea

And marched across the land, to set us free

 

Young and old they were alike

For their country they were ready to fight

Not knowing much of world affairs

Their life for us, they were willing to bear.

 

They trained in fields and camps

And shared many a story by their lamps

Family and friends they left behind

To lay their lives on the line.

 

To the mother land they sought

And the ways of war they were taught.

Their tools made of steel and wood.

Bread and bully beef for their food.

 

The blue puttees was their name

Fighting Newfoundlander’s were their fame

Young and old were alike

All ready for their country to fight.

 

Then the day of the Somme

801 of our Newfoundlander’s were moved along

To Beaumont Hamel and the enemy to fight

One by one they would never see the night.

 

From the trench of no man’s land they did dash.

At the stump of the danger tree, they were smashed

With that tin triangle on their sack

Only 68 of our men made it back.

This being the 100th anniversary of the battle in 2016, mason Gerald Thompson wrote a one-act play as a tribute to their memory.

A number of local dignitaries attended including Grand Falls-Windsor—Buchans MHA and Minister of Transportation and Works Allan Hawkins; Exploits MHA Jerry Dean; Noble Grand – Dennis Cooper; Dave Barker – Knights of Columbus; Joe Kennedy - Royal Canadian Legion and the Right Worshipful District Grand Master Brother W. Scott Bartlett.

At the function, Grand Falls-Windsor Mayor Barry Manuel presented Right Worshipful Master Brother Paul Evans with a plaque commemorating this occasion.

 

They That Served

 

By Gerald Thompson

 

The call from the king went out

The men from the island answered no doubt

They left the boats of the sea

And marched across the land, to set us free

 

Young and old they were alike

For their country they were ready to fight

Not knowing much of world affairs

Their life for us, they were willing to bear.

 

They trained in fields and camps

And shared many a story by their lamps

Family and friends they left behind

To lay their lives on the line.

 

To the mother land they sought

And the ways of war they were taught.

Their tools made of steel and wood.

Bread and bully beef for their food.

 

The blue puttees was their name

Fighting Newfoundlander’s were their fame

Young and old were alike

All ready for their country to fight.

 

Then the day of the Somme

801 of our Newfoundlander’s were moved along

To Beaumont Hamel and the enemy to fight

One by one they would never see the night.

 

From the trench of no man’s land they did dash.

At the stump of the danger tree, they were smashed

With that tin triangle on their sack

Only 68 of our men made it back.

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