Top News

Mission successful


The salmon trapping and trucking operation is almost finished and repairs to the Goodyear Dam are now complete.

All summer the Environment Resources Management Association (ERMA) has been transporting salmon around the dam so they can continue their upstream migration.

The dam is an impediment to fish that would normally have two working fishways.

Due to damages from ice last spring the dam was breached and the water level dropped, leaving the two salmon ladders inoperable.

ERMA was contracted through Nalcor to do the physical work of transporting fish while Hydro worked with the group to develop the plan for transportation and worked on the repairs for the dam.

“We’re in excess of 23,000 fish that we’ve transported around Goodyear’s Dam,” Wilmore Eddy, Nalcor Energy Exploits Generation Manager told The Advertiser, adding there wasn’t a single mortality.

In the view of Fred Parsons, ERMA’s general manager, “no mortality rate is acceptable.”

Parsons has been working with the fish population for over 30 years and he ensured that there were no shortcuts taken when it came to having the right workers for the job and ensuring that the operation was safe for the growing population of salmon.

Eddy explained that the fish are transported six kilometres upstream, two kilometres up from Goodyear’s Dam because, “when you release salmon they (have) a tendency to fall back in the river. So you have to release them far enough upstream so that they didn’t end up falling back and going over Goodyear’s Dam and not being able to get back up again.”

Parsons noted that the fishway is back in operation, however they now need to scientifically prove this, and back it up.

To that end, 10 of the salmon are getting radio telemetry tags. These will allow biologists to confirm that the salmon have made their way through the fishway, and are back on their natural migration pattern.

When the tagged fish make their way through the fishway, the trap and trucking operation will come to an end.

At that time, there should only be about a couple hundred fish left to swim through this season.

 

samantha.gardiner@tc.tc

 

All summer the Environment Resources Management Association (ERMA) has been transporting salmon around the dam so they can continue their upstream migration.

The dam is an impediment to fish that would normally have two working fishways.

Due to damages from ice last spring the dam was breached and the water level dropped, leaving the two salmon ladders inoperable.

ERMA was contracted through Nalcor to do the physical work of transporting fish while Hydro worked with the group to develop the plan for transportation and worked on the repairs for the dam.

“We’re in excess of 23,000 fish that we’ve transported around Goodyear’s Dam,” Wilmore Eddy, Nalcor Energy Exploits Generation Manager told The Advertiser, adding there wasn’t a single mortality.

In the view of Fred Parsons, ERMA’s general manager, “no mortality rate is acceptable.”

Parsons has been working with the fish population for over 30 years and he ensured that there were no shortcuts taken when it came to having the right workers for the job and ensuring that the operation was safe for the growing population of salmon.

Eddy explained that the fish are transported six kilometres upstream, two kilometres up from Goodyear’s Dam because, “when you release salmon they (have) a tendency to fall back in the river. So you have to release them far enough upstream so that they didn’t end up falling back and going over Goodyear’s Dam and not being able to get back up again.”

Parsons noted that the fishway is back in operation, however they now need to scientifically prove this, and back it up.

To that end, 10 of the salmon are getting radio telemetry tags. These will allow biologists to confirm that the salmon have made their way through the fishway, and are back on their natural migration pattern.

When the tagged fish make their way through the fishway, the trap and trucking operation will come to an end.

At that time, there should only be about a couple hundred fish left to swim through this season.

 

samantha.gardiner@tc.tc

 

Latest News